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NIGERIA
  • Date Created June 24, 2024
  • FCT
  • President Chief Bola Ahmed Adekunle Tinubu
  • Land Area
  • Population
  • LGA
  • GDP

History of Nigeria

Nigeria has a long and complex history that dates back to prehistoric times. The earliest known human settlements in the area now known as Nigeria were around 9000 BC. The area was later settled by various ethnic groups, including the Nok culture, which is known for its advanced ironworking technology.

During the 15th and 16th centuries, the region was colonized by the Portuguese, Dutch, and British. The British established control over Nigeria in 1861 and it became a British colony in 1914. Nigeria gained independence from British rule in 1960.

Since independence, Nigeria has had a tumultuous political history, with periods of military rule interspersed with democratic government. The country has also faced significant economic and social challenges, including poverty, corruption, and ethnic and religious conflicts. Despite these challenges, Nigeria remains a major economic and political power in Africa and is home to a diverse and vibrant culture.

                                                                 Ethnic Group

Nigeria is home to over 250 ethnic groups, each with its own distinct culture, language, and history. Some of the major tribes in Nigeria include:

The Hausa, who are the largest ethnic group in Nigeria and are primarily found in the northern states of the country. They are mostly Muslim and are known for their rich culture, including traditional music, dance, and art.

The Yoruba, who are one of the largest tribes in Nigeria and are primarily found in the southwestern states of the country. They are known for their rich culture, including traditional religion, music, and art.

The Igbo, who are one of the largest tribes in Nigeria and are primarily found in the southeastern states of the country. They have a rich cultural heritage and are known for their traditional music, art, and festivals.

The Fulani, who are a primarily Muslim ethnic group that is found throughout Nigeria. They are known for their nomadic lifestyle and their role in the trans-Saharan trade.

The Kanuri, primarily found in Borno, Yobe and Adamawa state, they are known for their traditional Islamic culture and the Kanem-Bornu Empire.

The Tiv, an ethnic group based in the middle belt of Nigeria, known for their rich culture, traditional religion, and art.

These are just a few examples of the many tribes that make up Nigeria's diverse population. Each tribe has its own unique culture, history, and customs, which have played a significant role in shaping Nigeria's society and identity as a nation.

                                                          Military Rule 

Nigeria has had a complex political history, with periods of military rule interspersed with democratic government. The country has experienced multiple military coups and periods of military dictatorship.

The first military coup occurred in 1966, led by Major Chukwuma Kaduna Nzeogwu, which resulted in the assassination of the Prime Minister, Sir Abubakar Tafawa Balewa, and other political leaders. This was followed by a counter-coup led by General Johnson Aguiyi-Ironsi who seized power, but was himself overthrown and killed in a counter-coup led by General Yakubu Gowon in July 1966.

General Yakubu Gowon ruled from 1966 to 1975, during which time Nigeria was involved in a civil war, known as the Biafra war, which lasted from 1967 to 1970. Gowon was overthrown by General Murtala Ramat Mohammed in a bloodless coup in 1975, who was himself assassinated in another coup in 1976, led by General Olusegun Obasanjo, who ruled until 1979 when he handed over to the civilian government.

After the 1979 election, there were several unsuccessful coup attempts, including one in 1983 which was led by Major-General Muhammadu Buhari, who later became the President in 2015.

Another military coup took place in 1993, led by General Sani Abacha, who ruled until his death in 1998. After his death, General Abdulsalami Abubakar took over and handed over power to the civilian government in 1999.

Since then, Nigeria has had a civilian government, but there were concerns of military intervention in politics. The military has been involved in counter-insurgency operations in the country, particularly in the fight against Boko Haram in the North-East region of the country.

The country has also seen some high-profile military interventions in politics, such as the removal of President Sani Abacha in 1998, the annulment of the 1993 Presidential election, and the overthrow of President Olusegun Obasanjo in a bloodless coup in 1999.

                                                                Culture

Nigeria is a country with a diverse culture that is influenced by its many ethnic groups. The most prominent cultural groups are the Hausa, Yoruba, and Igbo, each with their own distinct customs, languages, and traditions. Some common cultural practices include the use of traditional medicine, belief in a supreme being and ancestor veneration, music and dance, and the use of colorful fabrics in clothing. The country also has a rich history of art, including sculpture, textiles, and beadwork. Festivals and ceremonies, such as the annual Durbar Festival in the north, also play an important role in Nigerian culture.

                                                     Major Traditional Rulers

Nigeria has many traditional rulers, also known as traditional leaders or kings, who hold significant cultural and political influence within their communities. Some of the major traditional rulers in Nigeria include:

The Oba of Benin: The Oba of Benin is the traditional ruler of the Edo people and is considered one of the most powerful traditional rulers in Nigeria. He is the custodian of the Edo culture and history, and his palace is a major tourist attraction in the city of Benin.

The Emir of Kano: The Emir of Kano is the traditional ruler of the Kano Emirate, one of the oldest and most prominent traditional states in Nigeria. He is a respected leader in the northern region and holds significant political power.

The Ooni of Ife: The Ooni of Ife is the traditional ruler of the Yoruba people and is considered one of the most revered traditional rulers in Nigeria. He is the spiritual leader of the Yoruba people and holds a significant cultural and religious influence.

The Oba of Lagos: The Oba of Lagos is the traditional ruler of the Yoruba people of Lagos and holds significant cultural and political influence in Lagos State.

The Sultan of Sokoto: The Sultan of Sokoto is the leader of the Sokoto Caliphate, one of the most powerful traditional states in Nigeria. He is considered the spiritual leader of Nigeria's Muslims and holds significant religious and cultural influence.

These are just a few examples of the many traditional rulers in Nigeria, Each ethnic group has their traditional ruler.

 

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